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Campus Grounds

Built with Pride

The Chickasaw Cultural Center is a source of pride for all the people who helped make it a reality. It tells a story—the Chickasaw story. Our array of exhibits and campus grounds feature modern, state-of-the-art architecture that combines natural elements like wood, stone and copper for a warm and welcoming environment, beckoning you to explore and experience Chickasaw culture. It is our hope that this environment will allow you to experience the pride we feel about being Chickasaw. Seasons change, but we remain the same. Chikasha Poya: We are Chickasaw.

Campus Grounds

The Chickasaw Cultural Center is a source of pride for all the people who helped make it a reality. It tells a story—the Chickasaw story. Our array of exhibits and campus grounds feature modern, state-of-the-art architecture that combines natural elements like wood, stone and copper for a warm and welcoming environment, beckoning you to explore and experience Chickasaw culture. It is our hope that this environment will allow you to experience the pride we feel about being Chickasaw. Seasons change, but we remain the same. Chikasha Poya: We are Chickasaw.

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Aaholiitobli' Honor Garden

Aaholiitobli' Honor Garden

Resplendent with native plants and beautiful stone architecture, the Aaholiitobli' ("a place to honor") Honor Garden pays tribute to the Chickasaw leaders, elders and warriors who made us the proud and vibrant people we are today. With traditional landscaping elements and spiraling pathways and walls, this peaceful area features laser-cut photos of every Chickasaw Nation Hall of Fame inductee.

Facing the garden is the Oka' Aabiniili' (“a place for sitting on the water”) Water Pavilion. The Oka' Aabiniili' Water Pavilion features a deck that extends over a serenely landscaped pond. Guests can take in the tranquility of the area and view of the fountain that serves as the centerpiece of the Aaholiitobli' Honor Garden. For 25 cents, guests can purchase fish food and feed the fish.

The Arrival

Chickasaw artist Mike Larsen, renowned for American Indian art, created the bronze sculpture to commemorate the Chickasaws’ arrival to new territory after removal from our original homeland. Despite drawing inspiration from a painful period in the history of our people, the true message of “The Arrival” is hope and resilience. Featuring eight beautifully crafted Chickasaw characters, the statue stands nine-feet tall and boasts exquisite expression and detail.

The Arrival
The Warrior

The Warrior

A replica of the main statue at Chickasaw Nation Headquarters, “The Warrior” stands proud over the Cultural Center grounds. Created by Enoch Kelley Haney, a former Oklahoma Legislator and Principal Chief of the Seminole Nation, “The Warrior” brings us back to a time before European contact in 1540. It is said that tashka' Chikasha (translated to mean “Chickasaw warriors”) were fierce in battle, and “The Warrior” powerfully represents our people’s “unconquered and unconquerable” spirit.

Kochcha' Aabiniili' Amphitheater

The beautiful Kochcha' Aabiniili' (“a place for sitting outside”) Amphitheater is located at the center of our campus to encourage coming together through learning, the art of storytelling and culture. With room for 320 guests, the open-air venue hosts stomp dances, living history performances, concerts and cultural presentations. The issobinnochi' (“bell”) located next to the amphitheater is used for special occasions and serves as an homage to Sunday church bells that call parishioners to meetings and meals.

Kochcha' Aabiniili' Amphitheater
Aba' Aanowa' Sky Pavilion

Aba' Aanowa' Sky Pavilion

Take in a bird's-eye-view of the Chickasaw Cultural Center from our Aba' Aanowa' (“a place for walking above”) Sky Pavilion. This 40-foot vista offers a view of the Chikasha Inchokka' Traditional Village and the surrounding Chickasaw National Recreation Area.